TheAntiqueTrade Art Deco collection info
 
 
Antiques
Collectables
Pottery Porcelain Glass
Gemstone collection
Art Deco by item
Art Deco by type
Vintage Jewellery
Vintage Art
Quirky collectables
    Posh antiques
      Golden Fleece
        Collectable Bottles
        Antique books
        Rare stamps
        Medals Badges Coins
        Vintage Toys and Games
        Antique Shop inventory
          Antiques are Green
            Bad Ben Black Market
              SOLD Antiques
                General:
                 
                 
                Antiques, Collectables:
                 
                 
                Jewellery, Gemstones:
                 
                 
                Stamps:
                 
                 
                Find us on:
                 
                 
                Art Deco Store

                The Art Deco Store

                Selection    ART DECO by type     ART DECO by item   

                Dedicated to the 1930s Age of Glamour & Great Depression and all revival periods of that age. In recent years, the search for New Modern forms dictates the sharp resurgent in TIMELESS ART DECO popularity, and is again becoming the latest resort for all forms of modern functional art.

                THE NEW WAVE OF THE AGE OF GLAMOUR IS BACK AGAIN, LET IT RIDE TOGETHER!!!

                Art Deco Store

                Art Deco Collection Info contents
                Art Deco Store

                Art Deco
                Art Deco history
                Art Deco sources
                Art Deco attributes
                Art Deco materials and design
                Art Deco & Streamline Moderne
                Art Deco decline and resurgence
                Art Deco in Americas
                Art Deco in Europe
                Art Deco in Asia
                Art Deco in Oceania
                Art Deco in Africa

                In store Art Deco selection:

                THEANTIQUETRADE.CO.UK

                Art Deco Collection Info

                Art Deco jugs

                click for Art Deco jugs

                Art Deco

                Art Deco
                Art Deco was born in 1925. Today, "Art Deco" is made use of to refer to a mix of styles from the 1920s and 1930s. Led by the finest designers in the decorative arts such as fashion, and interior design, Art Deco impacted all areas of design throughout the 1920s and 30s, including architecture and industrial design, as well as the visual arts such as painting, the graphic arts and film.
                Art Deco moved away from the soft pastels and natural types of Art Nouveau and accepted impacts from lots of different designs and movements of the early 20th century, consisting of Neoclassical, Constructivism, Cubism, Modernism, and Futurism. Art Deco experienced a decrease in popularity throughout the late 30s and early 40s, however experienced a resurgence in the 1960s in 1968 to correspond with the Minneapolis exhibition and continued with the popularization of graphic design in the 1980s.
                The Art Deco period was one of contradictions. The role of women changed throughout World War I. With their spouses away at war, women had to take care of matters outside their estates and they were reluctant to offer up their liberty when men returned.
                Led by the best designers in the decorative arts such as fashion, and interior design, Art Deco affected all areas of design throughout the 1920s and 30s, consisting of architecture and industrial design, as well as the aesthetic arts such as painting, the graphic arts and movie. Art Deco relocated away from the soft pastels and natural types of Art Nouveau and accepted influences from many different styles and motions of the early 20th century, consisting of Neoclassical, Constructivism, Cubism, Modernism, and Futurism. Art Deco experienced a decrease in appeal throughout the late 30s and early 40s, but experienced a revival in the 1960s in 1968 to correspond with the Minneapolis exhibit and continued with the popularization of graphic design in the 1980s.

                Back to Top

                Art Deco vases

                click for Art Deco vases

                Art Deco history
                After the Universal Exposition of 1900, various French artists formed an informal collective known as La Société des artistes décorateurs (the society of the decorator artists). Founders included Hector Guimard, Eugène Grasset, Raoul Lachenal, Paul Bellot, Maurice Dufrêne, and Emile Decoeur. These artists heavily influenced the principles of Art Deco as a whole. This society's purpose was to demonstrate internationally the leading position and evolution of the French decorative arts. They organized the 1925 Exposition Internationale des Arts Décoratifs et Industriels Modernes (International Exposition of Modern Industrial and Decorative Art) in Paris, which would feature French art and business interests. The terms Style Moderne and Art Deco both derive from the exposition's title, though Art Deco was not widely used until popularized by art historian Bevis Hillier's 1968 book Art Deco of the 20s and 30s.
                In the summer of 1969, Hillier conceived organizing an exhibition called Art Deco at the Minneapolis Institute of Arts, which took place from July to September 1971. After this event, interest in Art Deco peaked with the publication of his 1971 book The World of Art Deco, a record of the exhibition. Art Deco was in part a rebellion against Art Nouveau. Although it adopted Art Nouveau's curved lines, Art Deco also adopted
                a structure and variety of geometric shapes.

                Back to Top

                Art Deco plates

                click for Art Deco plates and dishes

                Art Deco sources
                The framework of Art Deco is based on mathematical geometric forms. Among them were the alleged "primitive" arts of Africa, as well as historical styles such as Greco-Roman Classicism, and the art of Babylon, Assyria, Ancient Egypt, and Aztec Mexico. Art Deco additionally drew on Machine Age and streamline technologies such as contemporary air travel, electric lighting, the radio, the ocean liner and the high-rise building for motivation.

                Art Deco design influences were expressed in the crystalline and faceted kinds of ornamental Cubism and Futurism. Other prominent themes in Art Deco were trapezoidal, zigzagged, geometric, and jumbled forms, which can be seen in lots of early pieces.

                Back to Top

                Art Deco for tea

                click for Art Deco for tea

                Art Deco attributes
                Art Deco an opulent style, and its lavishness is attributed to reaction to the forced austerity imposed by World War I. Its rich, festive character fitted it for modern contexts, including the Golden Gate Bridge, interiors of cinema theaters and ocean liners such as the Île de France, Queen Mary, and Normandie. Art Deco was employed extensively throughout the train stations in the 1930s, designed to reflect the modernity and efficiency of the train. Art Deco made use of many distinctive styles, but one of the most significant of its features was its dependence upon a range of ornaments and motifs. The distinctive style of Art Deco was shaped by 'all the nervous energy stored up and expended in the World War II. Art Deco has been influenced in part by movements such as Cubism, Russian Constructivism and Italian Futurism, which are all evident in Art Deco decorative arts.

                Art Deco materials and design

                Man-made materials were incorporated into industrial design like plastics (bakelite, lucite), chrome, and aluminum. The use of plastic also made possible the production of consumer goods like radios inexpensively, in mass quantities, and in shapes and colors previously unattainable. Bakelite radios from this period like Spartan and Fada are highly collected, but at their time of production they were bringing colorful design and the sound of radio to the public through industrialization and mass production techniques. Art Deco is characterized by use of materials such as aluminium, stainless steel, lacquer, Bakelite, Chrome and inlaid wood. Exotic materials such as sharkskin (shagreen), and zebra skin were also in evidence. The bold use of stepped forms and sweeping curves (unlike the sinuous, natural curves of the Art Nouveau), chevron patterns, the ziggurat, the fountain, and the sunburst motif are typical of Art Deco. Some of these motifs were ubiquitous and were used in such varied contexts as ladies shoes, radiator grilles, the auditorium of the Radio City Music Hall, and the spire of the Chrysler Building. In 1920s and 30s  was a massive increase in the output of ornate ceramics, especially from the potteries of the Staffordshire area of Stoke-on-Trent. The Art Deco Potteries website concentrates of those factories outputting art wares which have since become indicative of the era and which encapsulate the Art Deco movement.

                Back to Top

                Art Deco

                click for Art Deco household

                Art Deco and Streamline Moderne

                Art Deco & Streamline Moderne
                Streamline was influenced by the modern-day aerodynamic designs, consisting of those emerging from advancing technologies in aviation, ballistics, and other industries requiring high velocity. The appealing forms resulting from applied aerodynamic concepts were enthusiastically embraced within Art Deco, using enhancing strategies to various other beneficial items in daily life, such as the car. Streamlining quickly affected European and American car design and changed the appearance from the rectangular "horseless" carriages into sleek cars with sweeping lines, balance, and V-shapes that added to their mystique of speed and effectiveness.

                Art Deco commemorates the Machine Age with specific use of manufactured materials glass, stainless steel and the brand-new plastics), proportion, and repeating, customized by Asian impacts such as using silks and Middle Eastern designs. It was strongly adopted in the United States throughout the Great Depression for its functionality and simpleness, while still portraying a reminder of better times and the "American Dream".

                Streamlining was geared to simpleness, the idea that less is more. Eliminating elements that littered an offered structure, chair, or painting was the focus of this new advancement of enhancing.

                Back to Top

                Art Deco grooming and perfume

                click for Art Deco grooming and perfume

                Art Deco decline and resurgence
                Art Deco slowly lost patronage in the West after reaching mass production, when it began to be derided as gaudy and presenting a false image of luxury. Eventually, the style was cut short by destruction in World War II. A resurgence and revival of ART DECO came first in the 1960’s and 70’s. Then again in the 1980's ART DECO re-merged with a growing interest in graphic design and Art Deco glamour led to its use in advertisements for jewelry and fashion. The current day revival of Art Deco is, of course, a transitional event. That is, it comes and goes in degrees of popularity but always comes back and never really goes away. It has a permanent niche in our society, probably due to it’s uniqueness, it’s high style and diversity of geometric design. The distinctive style of Art Deco has been echoed in many similar movements since its early decline. Art Deco influenced later styles such as Memphis and the Pop art movement. It also had an effect on post modern architecture and styles, even through to the late 1970s. Art Deco has also had a marked influence on contemporary design.
                In recent years, the search for New Modern forms dictates the sharp resurgent in TIMELESS ART DECO popularity, and is again becoming the latest resort for all forms of modern functional art. ART DECO is becoming the choice for the NEW MILLENNIUM.

                The NEW WAVE of the AGE OF GLAMOUR is back again, let it ride together!

                Back to Top

                Art Deco desktop

                click for Art Deco desktop

                Art Deco in Americas
                The United States has fine examples of Art Deco architecture. New York, Chicago, and Detroit have a great many deco buildings, the famous skyscrapers. Detroit's many examples of Art Deco architecture include the Fisher and Guardian Buildings both of which are National Historic Landmarks. Los Angeles, California, is also rich in Art Deco architecture, particularly along Wilshire Boulevard, a main thoroughfare that experienced a building boom in the 1920s. Miami Beach, Florida, has a large collection of Art Deco buildings, with some thirty blocks of hotels and apartment houses dating from the 1920s to the 1940s. In 1979 Miami Beach's Art Deco Historic District was listed on the National Register of Historic Places. Nearly all the buildings have been meticulously restored and painted in their original pastel colors. Fair Park, located in Dallas, Texas, is large collection of Art Deco structures. Much of the Art Deco heritage of Tulsa, Oklahoma remains from that city's oil boom days. Houston, Texas has some surviving buildings, such as the Houston City Hall, the JP Morgan Chase Building, Ezekiel W. Cullen Building, and the 1940 Air Terminal Museum, though many are threatened by modern development. In 2005 the largest residential restoration project in the country and the largest collection of Art Deco buildings in New Jersey began at the 14 acre site of the former Jersey City Medical Center. The conversion of the national historic site to a residential enclave had as of 2009 been completed on three of the several buildings on the site.
                Some of the finest surviving examples of Art Deco art and architecture are found in Cuba, especially in Havana. The Bacardi Building echoes the classic themes of Art Deco. The style is expressed in the architecture of residences, businesses, hotels, and many pieces of decorative art, furniture, and utensils in public buildings, as well as in private homes.
                Another country with many examples of rich Art Deco architecture is Brazil, especially in Goiânia and cities like Cipó (Bahia), Iraí (Rio Grande do Sul) and Rio de Janeiro. Also in the Brazilian Northeast - notably in countryside cities, such as Campina Grande in the state of Paraiba - there is a noticeable group of Art Deco buildings, which has been called “Sertanejo Art Deco” because of its peculiar architectural features. The reason for the style being so widespread in Brazil is its coincidence with the fast growth and radical economic changes of the country during 1930-1940. Art deco buildings are also numerous in Montevideo, Uruguay, including the iconic Palacio Salvo, which was South America's tallest building when it was built in the late 1920s.

                Back to Top

                Art Deco candlesticks

                click for Art Deco candlesticks

                Art Deco in Europe
                At the 1925 exposition several French masters unveiled work that created an international stir. Elegant inlaid wood furniture by Jacques Émile Ruhlmann, functional lacquerwork by Jean Dunand, silver jewellery by Jean Puiforcat, and glass vases by Lalique were hailed for their modernity and original lines. Ruhlmann designed a series of rooms for the exposition that had a far-reaching effect on American and European taste. Lalique later created a similarly streamlined decorative scheme for the luxurious French ocean liner Normandie.
                In London, the former Arsenal Stadium boasts the famous East Stand façade. William Bennie, the man behind the project, famously used the Art Deco style in the final design which was seen as one of the most impressive stands in world football. The London Underground is also famous for many examples of Art Deco architecture. One of the most famous surviving examples of the Art Deco style is the famous RMS Queen Mary, which is currently moored in retirement as a floating museum and hotel, a true lasting reminder to the past glory of the once numerous trans-Atlantic ocean lin
                ers, and to the Art Deco period.
                Valencia, Spain built profusely in Art Deco style during the period of economic bounty between wars in which Spain remained neutral. Particularly remarkable are the famous bath house Las Arenas, the building hosting the Rectorship of the University of Valencia and the cinemas Rialto (currently the Filmoteca de la Generalitat Valenciana), Capitol (reconverted into an office building) and Metropol. During the 1930s, Art Deco had a noticeable influence on house design in the United Kingdom, as well as the design of various public buildings. Straight, white-rendered house frontages rising to flat roofs, sharply geometric door surrounds and tall windows, as well as convex curved metal corner windows, were all characteristic of that period. In Kaunas, Lithuania whole street in the city center Laisves Aleja (Street of Freedom) has been build and dedicated to Art Deco style, unfortunately today’s city planers and architects misunderstood the 30’s style and allowed completely destroy ideal Art Deco feel and look.

                Back to Top

                Art Deco decanters

                click for Art Deco decanters

                Art Deco in Asia
                Mumbai, India has the second largest number of Art Deco buildings in the world after Miami.
                In China, at least sixty buildings designed by Hungarian architect Laszlo Hudec survive in downtown Shanghai of which many are Art Deco.
                In Indonesia, the largest stock of Dutch East Indies era buildings are in the large cities of Java. Bandung is of particular note with one of the largest remaining collections of 1920s Art Deco buildings in the world, with the notable work of several Dutch architects and planners, including Albert Aalbers that added the expressionist architecture style to the Art Deco by designing the DENIS bank (1936) and renovated the Savoy Homann Hotel (1939), Thomas Karsten, Henri Maclaine-Pont, J Gerber and C.P.W. Schoemaker. The Nederlandsche Handel Maatschappij building (1929), now Museum Bank Mandiri, by J de Bryun, AP Smiths, and C Van de Linde, and right across it, the Jakarta Kota Station (1929) designed by Frans Johan Louwrens Ghijsels, are the surviving Art Deco buildings in Jakarta.
                The Manila Metropolitan Theater located along P.Burgos Street in Manila is one of the few existing art deco buildings in the Philippines.

                Back to Top

                Art Deco for dinner table

                click for Art Deco for dinner table

                Art Deco in Oceania
                Napier, New Zealand, was rebuilt in the Art Deco style after being largely razed by the Hawke's Bay earthquake of 3 February 1931 and is the world's most thoroughly art deco city. Although a few Art Deco buildings were replaced with contemporary structures during the 1960s, 1970s and 1980s, most of the centre remained intact for long enough to become recognized as architecturally unique, and from the 1990s onwards had been protected and restored. As of 2007, Napier has been nominated for UNESCO World Heritage Site status, the first cultural site in New Zealand to be nominated. According to the World Heritage Trust, when Napier is compared to the other cites noted for their art deco architecture, Miami Beach, Santa Barbara, Bandung, Indonesia (originally planned as the future capital of Java), and Asmara in Eritrea (built by the Italians as a model colonial city).
                Hastings, New Zealand was also rebuilt in Art Deco style following the 1931 Hawke's Bay earthquake, and many fine deco buildings survive.

                Back to Top

                other Art Deco

                click for other Art Deco

                Art Deco in Africa
                Art Deco in Africa brought by the colonial powers in the 20's and 30's, the modern, cosmopolitan style was dotted across the continent as a way to demonstrate the African colonies break with old European architecture. From Art Deco cinemas in Ghana, Angola, Egypt and Zanzibar, to the entire "Art Deco city" of Asmara, Eritrea (the Miami Beach of Africa), decaying Art Deco monuments suggest a bygone era of adventurers, pilots, and explorers. Africa’s most celebrated examples of art deco were built in Eritrea during Italian rule. Many buildings survive in Asmara, the capital, and elsewhere. Also there are many buildings in downtown Casablanca, Morocco's economic capital.

                Back to Top






                Glossary of Antique terms  A - B - C - D - E - F - G - H - I - J - K - L - M - N - O - P - Q - R - S - T - U - V - W - X - Y - Z
                 
                Sitemap | FAQ's | Contact
                TheAntiqueTrade 100 percent secure